Two French Wine Trips To Take This Fall

I’ve recently written about two extraordinary travel opportunities for lovers of French wine. Both dive deep into culture and experience while keeping wine front and center.

Advertisements

Cahors: Your Favorite Wine For Fall

Château Lamartine Prestige du Malbec, 2014 is grown on soils comprised of 60% clay-limestone, 20% silex (flinty) clay and 20% limestone by Alain Gayraud, who was born in the château.

You Might Want To Take Notes: Wine Writers On Cahors

Cahors is home to the original malbec. One of the oldest wine regions in France, this relatively small spot is situated along the Lot River in Occitanie. Curious to learn more? Follow the Winophiles Twitter chat on Saturday, September 15, 2018 with our hashtag: #Winophiles.

Why Rosé Matters, According To French Culture

Grounded on centuries of experience held by Provençal vignerons and winemakers, the center harnesses a commitment to rosé, part of the Provençal culture for 2,600 years since the early Greeks utilized winemaking methods that resulted in pink-toned wine.

Guide to the Wines of Côtes de Bordeaux

Côtes de Bordeaux is comprised of Blaye, Cadillac, Castillon, Francs and Sainte-Foy appellations. Look at these growing regions as a sorority of sorts — unique individuals grouped together with a common purpose.

Mediterranean Bliss: Picpoul-de-Pinet

Picpoul’s naming origin means lip stinger for the acidic bite in the mouth of the drinker — this variety is notably high in acid, particularly for such a hot growing region. This explains what makes the grape unique, responsible for commercial thriving as well as ecological.

Languedoc Culture: Fleur de Sel from Gruissan

Languedoc is France’s most productive wine region, responsible for 5% of the world’s wine output. Although viticulture is the dominant agricultural industry, visitors score the rare opportunity to taste some of the world’s best salt — fleur de sel — at the source site in the quaint village of Gruissan.

Crémant Wines Check All the Right Boxes

Crémant wines check all the right boxes: affordable, high-quality, delicious, and diverse. With a robust selection of bottles in the $20-$30 range, crémant is approachable in price and expressive in profile.