Making a Meal with Wine from South Africa

Remhoogte adheres to this certification in the production of their estate Chenin Blanc, from 33-year-old vines (the oldest on the estate). It’s all harvested by hand and I find it interesting that only “exposed bunches on the morning sun side” are harvested for this wine, prized for the golden color they acquire from solar contact.

A Name To Know: Gérard Bertrand

Languedoc wine star Gérard Bertrand has significant reach a stone’s throw from major hotspots in Herault and Aude: Carcassonne, Narbonne and Montpellier.

‘Peace, Bread, Land and Wine’: A Meal With Brooks Winery

Do wine writers really want to be winemakers? Well, when it comes to Brooks Winery that’s probably true. It could be said that well-respected Brooks is a proxy for all that’s right in Oregon wine, the Willamette Valley in particular, Eola-Amity Hills, in super-particular.

Gravner: ‘Nature As A Source Of Thought’

Joško Gravner’s vineyards and cellars in Oslavia—in the Friuli region of Italy, stitched to the border of Slovenia, where one of Gravner’s vineyards exists—are infused with the philosophy that “nature offers everything we need.”

Lessons from a Biodynamic Winemaker in France

The SAUREL family runs a completely biodynamic shop. “Our farm evolved progressively towards farming which respects more and more the environment, the vines, the land and the quality of our wines,” says the family.

Guide to the Wines of Côtes de Bordeaux

Côtes de Bordeaux is comprised of Blaye, Cadillac, Castillon, Francs and Sainte-Foy appellations. Look at these growing regions as a sorority of sorts — unique individuals grouped together with a common purpose.

Mediterranean Bliss: Picpoul-de-Pinet

Picpoul’s naming origin means lip stinger for the acidic bite in the mouth of the drinker — this variety is notably high in acid, particularly for such a hot growing region. This explains what makes the grape unique, responsible for commercial thriving as well as ecological.

How the Cork Gets from a Tree to Your Bottle

The cork wine stopper is synonymous with preservation – not only of the wine in the bottle but of a way of life for cork farmers and the natural ecosystem of the forest. The process has been the same for generations because the system is a sustainable network benefiting the local economy, the environment, and the industries that utilize cork – particularly the wine industry.