Looking for Freshness? Check out Prosecco DOCG

Italian sparkling wine, Prosecco, bubbly

Prosecco DOCG bears an indication. Photo Credit: Jill Barth

In wine, I always look for freshness. Some of my favorites — from deep reds to pale rosé to crisp whites — bear a mark of distinct freshness. Nowhere is this more elemental than in sparkling wine.

Prosecco is one of the world’s best-known sparkling wines, loved by many and readily accessible. At the top of the quality scale for this wine from the Vento region of northeast Italy is the DOCG indication.

Five Hints To Prosecco DOCG

  • Prosecco DOCG hails specifically from hills in the Conegliano Valdobbiadene zone.
  • Prosecco DOCG is made from the Glera variety.
  • Conegliano, a prominent town in the region, is the home of Italy’s first School of Winemaking, an institution responsible for perfecting Prosecco crafting.
  • Hand harvest is required, by protocol.
  • Within the denomination are Asolo Prosecco DOCG and Conegliano Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore DOCG — comprised of Prosecco Superiore DOCG, Superiore Rive DOCG and Valdobbiadene Superiore di Cartizze DOCG.
Italian sparking wine, Italian bubbly, natural wine from Italy, natural sparking wine

Photo Credit: Jill Barth

The Presentation of Prosecco DOCG

Prosecco can be made in a still version, but most consumers seek out bubbly, which is made in either frizzante or spumante.

This, to me, is an interesting range because frizzante presents a lighter bubble load, while spumante sparkles in abundance.

Some of my favorite Prosecco DOCG bottles are frizzante, such as Col Fondo or Rifermentato in Bottiglia which translates to “with the bottom,” meaning with the lees. It’s unfiltered and experiences a second fermentation in the bottle, and presents more of a sour texture, not at all unlike a sour that I enjoy at my local brewery. Col Fondo is produced both DOC and DOCG. To taste the latter try, Malibràn Credamora Col Fondo Valdobbiadene DOCG Prosecco 2017.

More on col fondo in my recent Forbes piece, Col Fondo: This Frizzante, Bottle-Fermented Prosecco Is Curiously Delicious.

Prosecco, Italian bubbly

Photo Credit: Jill Barth

More traditionally, Prosecco DOCG is made in the Charmat Method (also called the Italian method), in which the second fermentation happens in the tank. Try Canevel Prosecco Valdobbiadene Spumante Brut DOCG which is brilliantly bubbly and packed with apple and white fruit flavors, an elegantly fresh wine.

bubbles for summer, Champagne vs Prosecco, what is Prosecco

Photo Credit: Jill Barth

Bellenda San Fermo Conegliano Valdobbiadene DOCG Prosecco Superiore Brut is crisp and readily acidic, satisfying the craving for freshness. It ages on lees prior to the second fermentation, which is the classic Charmat/Italian Method. It’s well-structured and enticing with apple notes and refreshing lime acidity.

Italian Food, Wine and Travel

If this sampling sounds cool to you, join a special Twitter chat on Saturday, July 6, 2019 — It’s all about Prosecco Superiore DOCG which celebrates a 10 year anniversary in 2019. (50 years, if you count the original DOC designation.)

You can follow the main hashtag (#ItalianFWT) and additional hashtags: 

#proseccosuperiore #coneglianovaldobbiadene #proseccodocg #proseccoelevated 

to be a part of this event.

Prosecco Anniversary Logo

The following writers are honoring this beautiful region and talented producers with the following stories:

You can read more about the Consorzio’s campaign to bring awareness to the United States here. And visit the Consorzio’s website for more information about Prosecco DOCG. Thanks to Liz of What’s in That Bottle? for sourcing the samples from the Consorzio — the wines featured here were provided as media samples, but all opinions are my own.

 

 

13 thoughts on “Looking for Freshness? Check out Prosecco DOCG

  1. I hadn’t thought about describing Proseccos as “fresh,” but it does make a lot of sense particularly with the sparkliness and how well it pairs with fresh fruit. Great viewpoint on the wines!

    Like

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